ahoy!

To the uninitiated, shipping law can seem complex.  This website provides diagrams and simple explanations of the basics to enable you to visualise how the big pieces in shipping law fit together. 

We chose to use diagrams where possible, as diagrams tend to make law simple without being overly reductionist. These diagrams are also downloadable so you can stick them to your wall (if that's the kind of thing that appeals). 

We designed the section on cargo claims as a complement to Debattista on Bills of Lading in Commodities Trade, (by the same authors), which addresses in more detail the relationship between sales contracts and contracts for the carriage of goods by sea. Thanks for reading!

Francis Hornyold-Strickland

Charles Debattista

There are two main areas of shipping law...

"Wet" shipping

This relates to things that happens to the ships themselves, like physical damage, like Collisions, scuttling etc.

"Dry" Shipping

dry shipping relates to the commercial use of the vessel and is further divided into two main areas:

Basics

There are two main areas of shipping law...

"Wet" shipping

Wet shipping relates to things that happen to the ships themselves, like physical damage: collisions, scuttling etc.

"Dry" Shipping

Dry shipping relates to the commercial use of the vessel and is best further sub-divided into two areas: 

charterparty disputes

cargo

disputes

Charterparty disputes pertain to the "vertical" relationship between the owner of the vessel and individuals/companies who wish to hire (charter) the vessel for a period of time or for a particular voyage or set of voyages. 

Cargo disputes concern a "horizontal" situation regarding carriage of cargo on a ship from place A to place B across the seas. 

© 2020 by Francis Hornyold-Strickland.